Production and shipment of auto-nosodes, e.g. placenta nosodes, umbilical cord and umbilical cord blood nosodes, mother's milk nosodes

The simple name for the complex human supply system for the first nine months of life is called the "placenta".

The organ at the upper edge of the uterus is called the placenta. It resembles a thick sponge; the mother’s blood flows inside its recesses.

placenta

Picture credit: Lippert: Anatomie, 5th edition, Page 349, reproduced with the kind permission of the Urbau & Schwarzenberg publishing house in Munich, all rights held by the publishers

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At one time, the Egyptians considered the placenta to be the center of the soul and in the prominent families, at least, it was retained throughout the "owner’s" life. During ceremonial occasions, a flag symbolizing the placenta was carried in front of the Pharaoh to protect him. Thus, for several thousand years, we know what an important function the placenta has between the nidation of the cell and birth. The use of the placenta for medical purposes can be tracked back over several centuries. Primitive medical science books already contained descriptions of uses of the placenta for a long time. Primitive people, including some Indian tribes in North America, also use the placenta for healing purposes. By carefully preparing the placenta tissue, it is largely possible to retain the extremely high content of natural substances and trace elements such as hormones, enzymes, amino acids and vitamins. Some facilities sell the placentas to the cosmetics industry, where they are processed into "face cream for mature skin".

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For a specific time, the placenta separates the blood streams of the mother and child. By the end of pregnancy, this extremely powerful organ becomes a disk that is about 2 – 4 centimeters thick, has a diameter of approx 20 centimeters and weighs approximately one pound; its blood vessels on the fetal side reach a length of 320 km. It supplies the child with nutrition and oxygen via the umbilical cord during the pregnancy. The placenta is considered to be a storage organ for life-sustaining vitamins and trace elements; it produces hormones and immunity substances to fight off infections, without which the body’s own immune system is unable to function. As the afterbirth, the placenta is not valued very highly by most women, even after the organ has served its purpose. The midwife examines the placenta to ensure it is complete. In many cultures, the placenta is then buried in the ground and a tree is planted over it. This tree then becomes one’s personal arbor vitae (tree of life). If you have a garden, you can choose a nice spot for the placenta and plant a tree over it. In Germany, a fruit or nut tree is traditionally selected for this (fruit is etymologically [from a philological point of view] related with obstetrics – midwifery).

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The diversity of tasks makes it plausible that possible changes in the placenta can lead to massive, threatening disturbances in the development of the child. Malfunctions are the cause for the major and most frequent illnesses during pregnancy such as gestosis (also known as pregnancy toxemia; the generic term used for pregnancy-specific illnesses as an expression of a metabolic lapse as a result of the strain of pregnancy), delays in the child’s development and diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy). Changes in the placenta can cause damage to the developing fetus.

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